Party Pooper: How to Avoid Getting Sick When You Travel

We at Onsite Travel would like to start this post by reminding our readers that most travel honestly go off perfectly fine. However, some advanced planning is always a good idea and can allow your odds of never having an issue while traveling increase dramatically if one of your party does get sick (knock on wood).

Everyone hates getting sick but getting sick when you are on vacation can be particularly unpleasant. People can become ill when they travel for a number of reasons. When you relax, your body’s immunity lowers because you are under less stress, making you more susceptible to everyday viruses. As crazy as this seems, stress will stimulate your immune system so when you relax you can open yourself to illnesses There is actually a term called “leisure sickness”.

New places you travel to can also contain unfamiliar pathogens and unfamiliar bugs in the environment that can affect you negatively. You may be excited to see Bejing, but your asthma certainly won’t be and cruising can be a killer for food born illness and/or seasickness. Below are some tips and tricks to help prevent and/or lessen different travel ailments so that, if they happen to you, it’ll just be a small bump in an otherwise great vacation.

Tips for Planning Ahead

Pack a Medical Kit

Be ready for the worst before it happens. Important things to consider are:

·         Cold Medicine
·         Bottled water
·         Insect repellent, try to make sure it has DEET
·         Sunblock, at least SPF 15 although SPF 5O is better
·         lip balm
·         antibiotic ointment
·         tweezers
·         bandages/gauze, adhesive tape, and scissors (if you bring one, bring the rest)
·         foot care products such as for blisters and athlete’s foot
·         diarrhea remedy
·         for women: feminine products

If you are traveling with a group in a land tour or on a cruise line these products may be available to purchase as you need them. However, they may not have what you need or they may be in short supply so it is best to be prepared and they can be amazingly expensive on board a ship.

*A Note on Packing Prescription Medication of Any kind

Keep prescription medication in their original containers while traveling. Remember to pack them in your carry-on, not your luggage and always bring a physical copy of your prescription in case you loose the medicine on your trip. Particularly when traveling out of the country, get a written note from your doctor explaining why you may be taking any narcotics and sedatives to prevent problems at border crossings. This too, should be packed in your carry-on.

Vaccines

It doesn’t happen often nowadays, but there are still a few countries that require vaccinations to enter the country. Particularly when visiting South America, be sure you are up to date on your vaccinations and talk to your doctor about different preventative measures you may want to take depending on where you are traveling.

Jet Lag: Disruption of the Body’s Internal Clock

Although it is called “jet lag”, this can affect anyone traveling across too many time zones when they’re on vacation. Prepare yourself for traveling across time zones by shifting your body’s clock slowly while your still at home. Do this by manipulating your light exposure, activity patterns, and so on so that it is not as jarring of a transition when you are in a new place. There are several thoughts on solving jet lag but the best way is to try and get on your new schedule a.s.a.p. once you arrive.

Tips for When You’re Traveling

Exercise

As I mentioned before, when you relax, your body’s immunity lowers because you are under less stress. One way to prevent this is to exercise lightly while on vacation. This could be something as simple as taking a brisk walk or swimming. If you stay active your body’s immune system will stay boosted.

Wear Mosquito Repellent

This is mostly in regards to the tropics. Mosquito’s can carry a number of different diseases, some of which you cannot get vaccinated against ahead of time like Dengue fever. Propellant can go a long way.

Avoid Under-cooked Food and Drink Only Bottled Water

This is mostly in regards to less developed countries to avoid stomach sickness, where traveler’s diarrhea is more prevalent. Do you enjoy spicy food? Cayenne peppers increase the intestine’s resistance to microbes that cause stomach pain and diarrhea. If you sprinkle enough on one meal a day to make it extra spicy, it will help keep the diarrhea  away. If you do get stomach sickness, no matter where you travel, calcium is thought to help increase growth of diarrhea-fighting bacterium, making it last for a shorter period of time.

Luck favors the prepared and as always, travel safe and have fun out there!!

image by James Diedrick: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jkdatlanta/3497413025
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Travel Insurance

Note from the blogger:
Aaaand we’re back! After a long hiatus I have finally graduated and am able to devote my time to getting this blog up and running again and keeping it running. A lot will hopefully be happening in the next little bit including a spread into more social media and more tips and destinations to poke at your wanderlust. This week we will be looking at an important subject to consider while traveling, because knocking on wood will only get you so far.

It’s a popular saying; Better to have it and not need it then need it and not have it. Travel insurance is something to consider when planning a vacation and just like regular insurance, it’s important to know your options.

There are 3 basic types of Travel Insurance:

  • Cancellation For Any Reason Insurance: insurance that insures you get all or most of your money back on a trip that you cancel prior to travel.
  • Cancellation for Medical Reasons Insurance: insurance that insures you get all or most of your money back on a trip that you cancel for documentable medical reasons
  • Medical Only Insurance: insurance for medical costs that may arise while traveling in the event of an accident. This would not entail compensation on the cost of the trip.

Cancellation Insurance: Why have it?

Most tours and cruises require a deposit before the cruise/tour is to be paid in full and about half of them are not refundable. Several cruise lines like Royal Caribbean and Celebrity are still refundable until final payment but the trend in the industry is less and less fully refundable deposits. This deposit will not be returned to you, or not returned in full, if you cancel within a certain time period, usually up until final payment when the regular cancellation schedules kick in. Cancellation insurance is to help get all or more of that deposit back that you normally would not be allowed. This insurance may not be a priority early on, but once you are within the ‘penalty’ window of paying for your vacation, our agents strongly suggest looking at insurance.

Cancellation For Any Reason Insurance or CFAR

This type of insurance assures you get all of your money back on a trip that you cancel prior to sailing except the insurance cost. It literally is “Cancel for any reason”. Ocean cruises do not offer this type of insurance and this is only an option if you are looking to book a land tour or river cruise. The cost of cancellation insurance is based on the cost of the trip itself, usually 7-9% of the trip’s cost in comparison, and is NOT based on age. It is a really nice option if available as you don’t have forms and such if you have to cancel. However, this one usually has to be purchased at the time of booking.

Cancellation for Medical Reasons Insurance

This insurance assures you get all or part of your money back on a trip that you have to cancel specifically for medical reasons. In order to invoke the insurance, you will need to have a doctor sign off on the fact that you or someone listed in your party is too sick or injured to travel. Most of these policies also include immediate family members that get sick or pass away. Any type of trip can be covered by medical cancellation insurance, including ocean cruises. Unlike CFAR, cancellation-for-any-reason insurance, cancellation for medical is based on age as well as trip cost. It is usually less cost then CFAR but can get pricey if you are over 70 years of age.

Medical Only Insurance

This is insurance to cover medical costs that may arise while traveling if someone gets sick or injured. Both types of cancellation insurances listed above also include medical insurance component, but you can purchase medical insurance by itself if you so choose. Medical insurance without cancellation insurance is the cheapest type of travel insurance by a surprisingly high margin. Despite this, it will cover all medical costs that you may have while on vacation, including emergency evacuation which can be well over $75,000 to get you home! Make sure that you look at the small print on these to make sure on the emergency medical evacuation. An important note about emergency evacuation, 99% of these companies that coordinate these evacuations WILL require that you show that you are able to pay for this and it is very pricey. If you have the medical only coverage, the company will coordinate all of this and get you the help that you need. Medical only insurance is a no brainer and you should have it as most of the insurance companies in the US do not cover you outside of the country and it is literally $20-$30 pre person for a trip.

Some cruises do sell their own insurance but it usually isn’t as comprehensive and not much cheaper than going with a 3rd party insurance agency. CSA Travel Protection is a well respected travel insurance provider and some credit card companies do offer cancellation insurance (with no medical coverage though). Again, no matter who you go with, read the fine print or call for details. Insurance companies are in business to make money so know what you are buying and if you are not sure ask for it in writing.
If you would like to search for yourself, www.insuremytrip.com allows you to compare different travel insurance based on your specific needs and the trip perimeters.

No matter what the case, we at Onsite Travel do recommend you look into travel insurance because life happens, even on vacation, and it’s good to be prepared.

Picture provided by: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Airplane_Flight_Wing_flying_to_Travel_on_Vacation.jpg

Money Saving Tips While Traveling

When it comes to most things, you get what you pay for and a vacation is definitely an example of that. In fact, that is what we at Onsite Travel are all about! Therefore this post will not be about “crazy cheap rates” and other ways to buy downmarket, but instead getting the best bang for your buck.

Of course, saving money on vacation will always depend on where you’re traveling but here are a few general tips when traveling abroad:

  • Finding the right card
    • As mentioned in the previous article, Pre-Vacation Planning: Getting Your Affairs in Order, some credit card companies charge fees for foreign transactions, usually ranging between 2-5%, depending on the company. See which company has the lowest fees (or, better yet, none at all) for using their card in the country you are traveling to.
  • Get local currency ahead of time
    • Transferring money over to local currency at airports and hotels often has a larger transaction fee than if you were to do the transfer back home. Make a list of all the countries you plan to visit as well as an estimated spending budget for each place to transfer to local currency to save on transactions. Remember, even if you plan to use a card for most of your transactions, having cash on you can always come in handy.

Image from: https://www.flickr.com/photos/rodeime/13991031669

In reference to Thanksgiving there is no Adventure of the Month as here in the U.S. November is very much a time to be with family. We spend the day eating and bonding with relations both as a celebration of thankfulness and preparation for elbowing our way through Black Friday sales. Winter is coming….

Happy Thanksgiving!