Party Pooper: How to Avoid Getting Sick When You Travel

We at Onsite Travel would like to start this post by reminding our readers that most travel honestly go off perfectly fine. However, some advanced planning is always a good idea and can allow your odds of never having an issue while traveling increase dramatically if one of your party does get sick (knock on wood).

Everyone hates getting sick but getting sick when you are on vacation can be particularly unpleasant. People can become ill when they travel for a number of reasons. When you relax, your body’s immunity lowers because you are under less stress, making you more susceptible to everyday viruses. As crazy as this seems, stress will stimulate your immune system so when you relax you can open yourself to illnesses There is actually a term called “leisure sickness”.

New places you travel to can also contain unfamiliar pathogens and unfamiliar bugs in the environment that can affect you negatively. You may be excited to see Bejing, but your asthma certainly won’t be and cruising can be a killer for food born illness and/or seasickness. Below are some tips and tricks to help prevent and/or lessen different travel ailments so that, if they happen to you, it’ll just be a small bump in an otherwise great vacation.

Tips for Planning Ahead

Pack a Medical Kit

Be ready for the worst before it happens. Important things to consider are:

·         Cold Medicine
·         Bottled water
·         Insect repellent, try to make sure it has DEET
·         Sunblock, at least SPF 15 although SPF 5O is better
·         lip balm
·         antibiotic ointment
·         tweezers
·         bandages/gauze, adhesive tape, and scissors (if you bring one, bring the rest)
·         foot care products such as for blisters and athlete’s foot
·         diarrhea remedy
·         for women: feminine products

If you are traveling with a group in a land tour or on a cruise line these products may be available to purchase as you need them. However, they may not have what you need or they may be in short supply so it is best to be prepared and they can be amazingly expensive on board a ship.

*A Note on Packing Prescription Medication of Any kind

Keep prescription medication in their original containers while traveling. Remember to pack them in your carry-on, not your luggage and always bring a physical copy of your prescription in case you loose the medicine on your trip. Particularly when traveling out of the country, get a written note from your doctor explaining why you may be taking any narcotics and sedatives to prevent problems at border crossings. This too, should be packed in your carry-on.

Vaccines

It doesn’t happen often nowadays, but there are still a few countries that require vaccinations to enter the country. Particularly when visiting South America, be sure you are up to date on your vaccinations and talk to your doctor about different preventative measures you may want to take depending on where you are traveling.

Jet Lag: Disruption of the Body’s Internal Clock

Although it is called “jet lag”, this can affect anyone traveling across too many time zones when they’re on vacation. Prepare yourself for traveling across time zones by shifting your body’s clock slowly while your still at home. Do this by manipulating your light exposure, activity patterns, and so on so that it is not as jarring of a transition when you are in a new place. There are several thoughts on solving jet lag but the best way is to try and get on your new schedule a.s.a.p. once you arrive.

Tips for When You’re Traveling

Exercise

As I mentioned before, when you relax, your body’s immunity lowers because you are under less stress. One way to prevent this is to exercise lightly while on vacation. This could be something as simple as taking a brisk walk or swimming. If you stay active your body’s immune system will stay boosted.

Wear Mosquito Repellent

This is mostly in regards to the tropics. Mosquito’s can carry a number of different diseases, some of which you cannot get vaccinated against ahead of time like Dengue fever. Propellant can go a long way.

Avoid Under-cooked Food and Drink Only Bottled Water

This is mostly in regards to less developed countries to avoid stomach sickness, where traveler’s diarrhea is more prevalent. Do you enjoy spicy food? Cayenne peppers increase the intestine’s resistance to microbes that cause stomach pain and diarrhea. If you sprinkle enough on one meal a day to make it extra spicy, it will help keep the diarrhea  away. If you do get stomach sickness, no matter where you travel, calcium is thought to help increase growth of diarrhea-fighting bacterium, making it last for a shorter period of time.

Luck favors the prepared and as always, travel safe and have fun out there!!

image by James Diedrick: https://www.flickr.com/photos/jkdatlanta/3497413025
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Packing a Suitcase: Traveling Light, Traveling With Caution

I believe almost everyone has grown up with some notion of how to pack for travel. Be it a childhood sleepover, camping, or (as we’ll talk about here) a vacation.

When going on vacation, especially one involving airplane travel and security, packing your luggage can be an extremely important step. Taking measures to ensure your things don’t get lost or damaged can help put your mind at ease and no one wants to get stuck at the airport with extra costs or because their luggage doesn’t meet the airline’s guidelines.

On cruises, the baggage policy tends to be simply that if your baggage fits in your room you can bring it. (Although this may be tempting for all the heavy packers out there, just remember, the more luggage you bring the small your room becomes) However, almost every vacation will involve some sort of airplane travel. As many seasoned travelers know, THIS is where packing can get tricky and what we will be focusing on in this post.

First let’s discuss the difference between carry on and check in:

  • Check in luggage
  • Has size and weight restrictions
    • Usually costs extra domestically but is free for 1 bag per person internationally
    • Is stored elsewhere
  • Carry on luggage
    • Has size restrictions
    • Usually has no extra cost
    • Stays with you

Carry on is usually the best way to go fot shorter trips. Your luggage stays in sight, isn’t tossed around as much, and you don’t have to pay any extra cost. Check with your airline about their baggage policies when you begin packing and keep rechecking as these policies change constantly. Be sure to ask:

  • How much you can travel with: size and weight limits for both carry on and check in
  • How much it costs for check in luggage (it usually ranges from $25 to $40 per bag)
  • What is allowed as a carry on: dimensions of the bag or suitcase

When you do begin packing the first 2 rules of thumb are:

“If you can’t replace it easily, don’t bring it”  IE if you will be really upset that the airline lost the special shirt that yout wife bought for you don’t pack it.

“If you need something no matter what , keep it in your carry on.” IE Prescription medicine, glasses, contacts, anything that would be hard to replace where you are going makes this list. If you can hit a local drug store and replace it you are set but not something that you need scipts for.  SIDENOTE: prescription meds MUST be in the original bottles with the labels attached. TSA types love to mess with this stuff and you don’t need the hassles and delays.

Remember that anything you take can get stolen, damaged, or simply forgotten and if it is irreplaceable, its best left at home. If it is something you need for the trip, like medication or a camera, keep it in a carry on. As mentioned before a carry on stays with you on the plane and is less likely to get lost, stolen, or damaged through your travels. If something does happen to your check in during airline travel, travel insurance will cover missing, lost, or stolen baggage up to a point. The airline will cover very little.

Other Tips for Packing:

  • Get sturdy luggage
    • Luggage gets thrown around, prepare for this as best you can. Buy sturdy luggage that is unlikely to be dented. We at On Site Travel actually recommend hard-sided plastic, it doesn’t dent. Strap down the contents inside and don’t put breakable items in a check in.
  • Avoiding check in baggage is avoiding extra costs and extra headache
    • Try to keep your baggage within carry on restrictions. If you can’t, all breakable and valuable items go in the carry on.
  • Leave extra room for souvenirs
    • Remember, you may buy things on your trip, and they will require extra baggage space. Account for that in advance so you aren’t surprised that your baggage no longer fits within airline policy on your way home. There are two ways to do this:
      • If you’re allowed 2 carry ons, pack a smaller suitcase within a larger suitcase (suitcase-ception) on the plane ride over so that you can use smaller suitcase for souvenirs on the ride home
      • Use an expandable suitcase (make sure that the expanded form is still within carry on limits) and make sure it isn’t expanded on the trip over. You can use the expansion space on the trip home to gain the extra room.
    • If you buy something large while on vacation, ask about shipping options. If it can be shipped home you will not need to worry about fitting it in your luggage.
  • Ask about laundry facilities where you are vacationing (be it a hotel or a cruise)
    • If there are, you can pack less.
  • NEVER USE VACUUM SEALING BAGS
    • Although they save room, think about how much room they will take up after they are unsealed after the trip when you are repacking or even during a baggage check. Also, if one of them breaks your baggage can explode. All in all, not a good idea. If you have problems preserving room with clothing, I suggest looking into the KonMari folding method instead.

Happy Packing!

Hawaii Interesting Fact
A creole language in Hawaii spoken by many locals is known as Pidgin. It started on the sugarcane plantations as a way for the English-speaking plantation owners and Non-English speaking Hawaiian and foreign workers to communicate with each other. Pidgin is American English based but includes traces of Hawaiian, Portugese, Cantonese, Japanese, Korean, and Tagalog. In recent years a few local books, poems, and plays have even been written in the local dialect and a few popular works have even been translated to Pidgin. One popular example (available on amazon.com) is the Bible, or in Pidgin, Da Jesus Book.

image source: https://www.pexels.com/photo/travelling-travel-traveling-packing-30855/